Thursday, April 30, 2009

Relation of PON1 and CYP1A1 genetic polymorphisms to clinical findings in a cross-sectional study of a Greek rural population professionally exposed to pesticides

Toxicol Lett. 2009 Apr 10;186(1):66-72. Epub 2008 Oct 28.Click here to read

Relation of PON1 and CYP1A1 genetic polymorphisms to clinical findings in a cross-sectional study of a Greek rural population professionally exposed to pesticides.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19022366

Centre of Toxicology Sciences and Research, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, Voutes, Heraklion, 71409 Crete, Greece. aris@med.uoc.gr

Allelic variants of CYP1A1 and PON1 have been extensively studied as susceptibility factors in toxic response, although little is known about the role of these variants as risk factors for the plethora of diseases appearing in the human population. In this study we investigated the hypothesis of correlation of CYP1A1 and PON1 enzymes with the incidence of various medical examination findings in a Greek rural population professionally exposed to a variety of pesticides. The medical history of 492 individuals, randomly selected for the total population of 42,000, was acquired by interviews and their genotype determined for the CYP1A1*2A, PON1 M/L and PON1 Q/R polymorphisms. The assessment of exposure to pesticides of the population was verified by analytical methods. Analysis of the genetic data revealed that the allele frequencies of PON1 R, M and CYP1A1*2A alleles were 0.243, 0.39 and 0.107 respectively. The CYP1A1*2A polymorphism was found to have significant association with chronic obstructive pneumonopathy (p=0.045), peripheral circulatory problems (trend p=0.042), arteritis (p=0.022), allergies (trend p=0.046), hemorrhoids (trend p=0.026), allergic dermatitis (p=0.0016) and miscarriages (p=0.012). The PON1 Q/R polymorphism was found to have significant association with hypertension (p=0.046) and chronic constipation (p=0.028) whereas, the L/M polymorphism, with diabetes (p=0.036), arteritis (trend p=0.022) and hemorrhoids (trend p=0.027). Our results demonstrated an association between the CYP1A1/PON1 polymorphisms and several medical examination findings, thus indicating the possible involvement of the human detoxification system to health effects in a rural population exposed professionally to pesticides.

PMID: 19022366 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Neurobehavioral effects of ambient air pollution on cognitive performance in US adults.

Neurotoxicology. 2009 Mar;30(2):231-9. Epub 2008 Dec 30.Click here to read Links

Neurobehavioral effects of ambient air pollution on cognitive performance in US adults.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez/19150462

Department of Epidemiology, UNC-School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC, United States; Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States.

BACKGROUND: In vivo animal experiments demonstrate neurotoxicity of exposures to particulate matter (PM) and ozone, but only one small epidemiological study had linked ambient air pollution with central nervous system (CNS) functions in children. OBJECTIVES: To examine the neurobehavioral effects associated with long-term exposure to ambient PM and ozone in adults. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of the Neurobehavioral Evaluation System-2 (NES2) data (including a simple reaction time test [SRTT] measuring motor response speed to a visual stimulus; a symbol-digit substitution test [SDST] for coding ability; and a serial-digit learning test [SDLT] for attention and short-term memory) from 1764 adult participants (aged 37.5+/-10.9 years) of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 1988-1991. Based on ambient PM(10) (PM with aerodynamic diameter <10mum) and ozone data from the EPA Aerometric Information Retrieval System database, estimated annual exposure prior to the examination were aggregated at the centroid of each census-block group of geocoded residences, using distance-weighted averages from all monitors in the residing and adjoining counties. Generalized linear models were constructed to examine the associations, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: In age- and sex-adjusted models, PM(10) predicted reduced CNS functions, but the association disappeared after adjustment for sociodemographic factors. There were consistent associations between ozone and reduced performance in NES2. In models adjusting for demographics, socioeconomic status, lifestyle, household and neighborhood characteristics, and cardiovascular risk factors, ozone predicted high scores in SDST and SDLT, but not in SRTT. Each 10-ppb increase in annual ozone was associated with increased SDST and SDLT scores by 0.16 (95%CI: 0.01, 0.23) and 0.56 (95%CI: 0.07, 1.05), equivalent to 3.5 and 5.3 years of aging-related decline in cognitive performance. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides the first epidemiological data supporting the adverse neurobehavioral effects of ambient air pollutants in adults.

Monday, April 27, 2009

NEWSLETTER: MCS America News - May 2009

MCSA NEWS
May 2009, Volume 4, Issue 5

 

Entire PDF Edition: http://mcs-america.org/may2009.pdf  (View, Download, and Print)
NEW!  Entire Online Edition:
http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm   (View as a Webpage)

  

Direct Links to Articles Inside This Issue:

 

Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Awareness Month 2009

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg12.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_Multiple_Chemical_Sensitivity

 

How to Promote MCS Awareness

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg3.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_How_to_Promote

 

2009 Proclamations

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg4567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_2009_MCS_Awareness

 

The Americans with Disabilities Act

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg3031.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_The_Americans_with

 

MCS Awareness in Schools

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg3233.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_MCS_Awareness_in

 

MCS Awareness for Health Care Providers

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg3435363738394041424344454647.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_MCS_Awareness_for

 

Real Life Examples

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg4849.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_Real_Life_Examples

 

MCS Awareness at the Library

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg50.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_MCS_Awareness_at

 

MCS at the State Capitol

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg51.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_Fast_Metabolism_Linked

 

Issuing a Press Release

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg52.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_Issuing_a_Press

 

MCS Awareness Through Media Coverage

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg5354.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_MCS_Awareness_Through

 

Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Fact Sheet

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg54.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_Q&A__Clipping

 

Patient Support and Resources

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg5556575859606162.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_Resources_and_Support

 

Community News

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg63.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_Community_News_4

 

Featured Research

PDF Version:      http://mcs-america.org/May2009pg646566.pdf

Online Version:  http://mcs-america.org/mcsanewsmay2009.htm#_Featured_Research_Studies_4

 

Multiple Chemical Sensitivities America
http://www.mcs-america.org  

admin@mcs-america.org

 

 

Copyrighted © 2008  MCS America

 

You have received this newsletter because you subscribed to it.

If you wish to unsubscribe, please send a message to unsubscribe@mcs-america.org.

 

This newsletter may be forwarded provided it is forwarded in it's entirety.

Some individuals may receive this newsletter through forwarded posts from independent listserves/groups .

If you no longer wish to receive mail, contact your administrator or unsubscribe from your listserv/group.

__._,_.___

Sunday, April 26, 2009

The "Question" of Health Reform


An enlightening article about the frightening healthcare implications of the H.R.1 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.  A must read for every American.

Friday, April 24, 2009

Mobile and cordless telephones, serum transthyretin and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier: a cross-sectional study.

Environ Health. 2009 Apr 21;8(1):19. [Epub ahead of print]Click here to read Links

Mobile and cordless telephones, serum transthyretin and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier: a cross-sectional study.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Whether low-intensity radiofrequency radiation damages the blood-brain barrier has long been debated, but little or no consideration has been given to the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In this cross-sectional study we tested whether long-term and/or short-term use of wireless telephones was associated with changes in the serum transthyretin level, indicating altered transthyretin concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid, possibly reflecting an effect of radiation. METHODS: One thousand subjects, 500 of each sex aged 18-65 years, were randomly recruited using the population registry. Data on wireless telephone use were assessed by a postal questionnaire and blood samples were analyzed for serum transthyretin concentrations determined by standard immunonephelometric techniques on a BN Prospec(R) instrument. RESULTS: The response rate was 31.4%. Logistic regression of dichotomized TTR serum levels with a cut-point of 0.31 g/l on wireless telephone use yielded increased odds ratios that were statistically not significant. Linear regression of time since first use overall and on the day that blood was withdrawn gave different results for males and females: for men significantly higher serum concentrations of TTR were seen the longer an analogue telephone or a mobile and cordless desktop telephone combined had been used, and in contrast, significantly lower serum levels were seen the longer an UMTS telephone had been used. Adjustment for fractions of use of the different telephone types did not modify the effect for cumulative use or years since first use for mobile telephone and DECT, combined. For women, linear regression gave a significant association for short-term use of mobile and cordless telephones combined, indicating that the sooner blood was withdrawn after the most recent telephone call, the higher the expected transthyretin concentration. CONCLUSIONS: In this hypothesis-generating descriptive study time since first use of mobile telephones and DECT combined was significantly associated with higher TTR levels regardless of how much each telephone type had been used. Regarding short-term use, significantly higher TTR concentrations were seen in women the sooner blood was withdrawn after the most recent telephone call on that day.

PMID: 19383125 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Boundary objects in the multidisciplinary care management of chronic conditions: multiple chemical sensitivity.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;143:534-9.Click here to read LinkOut

Boundary objects in the multidisciplinary care management of chronic conditions: multiple chemical sensitivity.

Nova Scotia Environmental Health Centre, Capital District Health Authority, NS, Canada.

Chronic conditions such as Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) are a significant challenge to the health care system as they are poorly understood, poorly documented and lack accepted or standardized treatment strategies. Research has shown that the successful management of patients with such conditions requires a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and the comprehensive assessment of factors contributing to the ill health. Results from two studies that have shown reduction in health care costs and improvement in symptoms for patients with MCS are presented. We explore the use of a controlled clinical vocabulary as a boundary object in care documents to facilitate collaborative management of patients with MCS.

PMID: 19380988 [PubMed - in process]

Immune cell counts and risks of respiratory infections among infants exposed pre- and postnatally to organochlorine compounds: a prospective study.

Environ Health. 2008 Dec 4;7:62.

Immune cell counts and risks of respiratory infections among infants exposed pre- and postnatally to organochlorine compounds: a prospective study.

Glynn A, Thuvander A, Aune M, Johannisson A, Darnerud PO, Ronquist G, Cnattingius S.

National Food Administration, Research and Development Department, PO Box 622, SE-751 26 Uppsala, Sweden. anders.glynn@slv.se

BACKGROUND: Early-life chemical exposure may influence immune system development, subsequently affecting child health. We investigated immunomodulatory potentials of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and p,p'-DDE in infants. METHODS: Prenatal exposure to PCBs and p,p'-DDE was estimated from maternal serum concentrations during pregnancy. Postnatal exposure was calculated from concentrations of the compounds in mother's milk, total number of nursing days, and percentage of full nursing each week during the 3 month nursing period. Number and types of infections among infants were registered by the mothers (N = 190). White blood cell counts (N = 86) and lymphocyte subsets (N = 52) were analyzed in a subgroup of infants at 3 months of age. RESULTS: Infants with the highest prenatal exposure to PCB congeners CB-28, CB-52 and CB-101 had an increased risk of respiratory infection during the study period. In contrast, the infection odds ratios (ORs) were highest among infants with the lowest prenatal mono-ortho PCB (CB-105, CB-118, CB-156, CB-167) and di-ortho PCB (CB-138, CB-153, CB-180) exposure, and postnatal mono- and di-ortho PCB, and p,p'-DDE exposure. Similar results were found for pre- and postnatal CB-153 exposure, a good marker for total PCB exposure. Altogether, a negative relationship was indicated between infections and total organochlorine compound exposure during the whole pre- and postnatal period. Prenatal exposure to CB-28, CB-52 and CB-101 was positively associated with numbers of lymphocytes and monocytes in infants 3 months after delivery. Prenatal exposure to p,p'-DDE was negatively associated with the percentage of eosinophils. No significant associations were found between PCB and p,p'-DDE exposure and numbers/percentages of lymphocyte subsets, after adjustment for potential confounders. CONCLUSION: This hypothesis generating study suggests that background exposure to PCBs and p,p'-DDE early in life modulate immune system development. Strong correlations between mono- and di-ortho PCBs, and p,p'-DDE exposures make it difficult to identify the most important contributor to the suggested immunomodulation, and to separate effects due to pre- and postnatal exposure. The suggested PCB and p,p'-DDE modulation of infection risks may have consequences for the health development during childhood, since respiratory infections early in life may be risk factors for asthma and middle ear infections.

PMID: 19055819

OHIO'S "GREEN" SENATE BILL HIGHLIGHT MCS AWARENESS MONTH

NEWS FROM:

THE OHIO NETWORK FOR THE CHEMICALLY INJURED

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For Further Information Contact:

Toni Temple (440) 845-1888

 

OHIO'S "GREEN" SENATE BILL, GREEN LIBRARY MEETINGS, AND GREENING OF THE FLEETS

HIGHLIGHT MCS AWARENESS MONTH

http://www.ohionetwork.org/2009/2009release.pdf

 

"Green Progress" is taking place in Ohio to increase awareness about and create a safer

environment for those with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS), a chronic health condition

caused by exposure to toxic environmental chemicals we are surrounded with in our daily lives.

Those with MCS frequently develop neurological, pulmonary, cardiac, rheumatic, and vascular

conditions from toxic exposures. Others develop cancer, asthma, depression, Parkinson's,

Alzheimers, birth defects, and other serious health conditions from the same toxic exposures that

cause MCS.

Senators Dale Miller (D-Cleveland) and Kevin Coughlin (R-Cuyahoga Falls), joint prime

sponsor, recently drafted a Bill to permanently designate May as "Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

Awareness Month" in Ohio. The Bill encourages citizens to take "Simple Steps" to remove

chemical barriers and improve the environment for MCS sufferers. Senator Miller further

encourages the State of Ohio; local governments, business, labor, and community groups; and

citizens to create and participate in activities to increase awareness of and helpful responses to

MCS.

The Ohio Network for the Chemically Injured (ONFCI), a not for profit corporation, has

advocated on behalf of those with MCS since the early 90s, facilitates educational efforts, and

provides support and networking for those with MCS. "We sincerely appreciate Senator Miller's

extensive efforts to learn about MCS, his MCS Awareness Month Bill, and his wake-up call to

those who have been disputing the validity of MCS," said ONFCI President Toni Temple.

"Green Meetings" will be held in May at the Parma Heights Branch of the Cuyahoga

County Public Library (CCPL). Speakers include ONFCI Board Member Theodore J. Esborn, a

local environmental attorney and co-producer of the PBS documentary "The Return of the

Cuyahoga." Mr. Esborn's program (WED May 6 at 7 p.m.) covers health effects caused by our

environment (from both chronic and high level exposures) and will include video excerpts from

Alison Johnson's interviews of "911" rescue workers, Gulf War victims, the Exxon Valdez

Cleanup Crew, and Victims of Hurricane Katrina (www.alisonjohnsonmcs.com). Jeff Heinen,

co-owner of Heinen's Fine Foods, will talk about "Eating Green" and food safety (WED May 13

at 7 p.m.). The Green Building Coalition will share tips on greening your home (THU May 21 at

7 p.m.). Speakers will provide a question and answer period. CCPL's 28 branches and their

administrative office building will participate in MCS Awareness Month. MCS bookmarks and

other MCS materials will be available at all branches. Some branches will display related books

and provide other information.

"Greening of the Fleets" is taking place in the Greater Cleveland Area thanks to David

R. Celebrezze of Ohio Environmental Council (OEC) who has helped cities and school districts

in writing diesel retrofit grants. "Thanks to Toni Temple of ONFCI, we have been working with

Parma Heights to retrofit two of their ambulances. In the next month, this will become a reality

and Parma Heights will be the first in the state to retrofit an ambulance," stated David R.

Celebrezze. The emission control devices will eliminate 100% of emissions from entering the

cabin and reduce tailpipe emissions by 40%.

Parma Fire Chief John French and EMS Training Captain Anthony Dalesio, are to be

congratulated for creating MCS Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) that safeguard and

accommodate those with MCS and others intolerant of diesel fumes during emergency transport.

Dr. Carl Schikowski, Parma Hospital's Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Director, issued

MCS Paramedic Protocol to prevent harm to MCS patients from known allergens, medications

and medical supplies.

We encourage you to follow Senator Miller's example and create your own "simple

steps." The MCS Senate Bill will be on display at libraries during May. Deposit your ideas in

the "Simple Step" Box at the Parma Heights Branch of CCPL before May 31 or mail it to

ONFCI , P.O. Box 29290, Parma, OH 44129. A prize will be awarded for the best idea.

For further information about MCS visit our website at www.ohionetwork.org . Contact

OEC about grant information for diesel retrofits for your city's fleet at (614) 487-7506, Ext 115.

For further information and to register for CCPL's Green Meetings at the Parma Heights Branch,

call (440) 884-2313. Those with MCS and their supporters can contact their Ohio Senator to ask

for co-sponsorship or support of Senator Miller and Coughlin's MCS Bill. Libraries can provide

contact information for your senator.

# # #

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Mobile and cordless telephones, serum transthyretin and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier: a cross-sectional study

Mobile and cordless telephones, serum transthyretin and the
blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier: a cross-sectional study
http://www.ehjournal.net/content/8/1/19

Abstract

Background: Whether low-intensity radiofrequency radiation damages the
blood-brain
barrier has long been debated, but little or no consideration has
been given to the
blood cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In this cross-sectional study we
tested whether long-term and/or
short-term use of wireless telephones was associated with changes in the
serum transthyretin
level, indicating altered transthyretin concentration in the
cerebrospinal fluid, possibly
reflecting an effect of radiation.

Methods: One thousand subjects, 500 of each sex aged 18-65 years, were
randomly recruited
using the population registry. Data on wireless telephone use were
assessed by a postal
questionnaire and blood samples were analyzed for serum
transthyretin concentrations
determined by standard immunonephelometric techniques on a BN Prospec®
instrument.

Results: The response rate was 31.4%. Logistic regression of
dichotomized TTR serum
levels with a cut-point of 0.31 g/l on wireless telephone use yielded
increased odds ratios that
were statistically not significant. Linear regression of time since first
use overall and on the
day that blood was withdrawn gave different results for males and
females: for men
significantly higher serum concentrations of TTR were seen the longer an
analogue telephone
or a mobile and cordless desktop telephone combined had been used,
and in contrast,
significantly lower serum levels were seen the longer an UMTS
telephone had been used.
Adjustment for fractions of use of the different telephone types did not
modify the effect for
cumulative use or years since first use for mobile telephone and
DECT, combined. For
women, linear regression gave a significant association for
short-term use of mobile and
cordless telephones combined, indicating that the sooner blood was withdrawn
after the most
recent telephone call, the higher the expected transthyretin concentration.

Conclusions: In this hypothesis-generating descriptive study time since
first use of mobile
telephones and DECT combined was significantly associated with
higher TTR levels
regardless of how much each telephone type had been used.
Regarding short-term use,
significantly higher TTR concentrations were seen in women the sooner blood
was withdrawn
after the most recent telephone call on that day.

Saturday, April 18, 2009

Ockham's Razor and autism: The case for developmental neurotoxins contributing to a disease of neurodevelopment

Ockham's Razor and autism: The case for developmental neurotoxins contributing to a disease of neurodevelopment
aDepartment of Psychology, University of Northern Iowa, Baker Hall, Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0505, United States

Received 16 January 2009; 
accepted 7 March 2009. 
Available online 21 March 2009.
 

Abstract

Much professional awareness regarding environmental triggers for ASD has been narrowly focused on a single possible exposure pathway (vaccines). Meanwhile, empirical support for environmental toxins as a broad class has been quietly accumulating. Recent research has shown that persons with ASD have comparatively higher levels of various toxins and are more likely to have reduced detoxifying ability, and, that rates of ASD may be higher in areas with greater pollution. This report documents that within the state with the highest rate of ASD, the rate is higher for schools near EPA Superfund sites, t (332) = 3.84, p = .0001. The reasons for the rise in diagnoses likely involve genetically predisposed individuals being exposed to various environmental triggers at higher rates than in past generations.

Keywords: Autism; Developmental disorders; Toxins; Pollution; Heavy metals; Environmental contaminants

ACTION: Anti-adulteration actions aren't working, says FDA

Anti-adulteration actions aren't working, says FDA
http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/content/view/print/243253

The US Food and Drug Administration has said current regulations are not
working to prevent deliberate contamination of food and pharmaceutical
products and has called a public meeting to address the issue.

The FDA is inviting attendees to register for the meeting at
http://www.fda.gov/oc/meetings/ema.html and invites comments via
http://www.regulations.gov .

Friday, April 17, 2009

Treating patients with fibromyalgia in primary care settings under routine medical practice: a claim database cost and burden of illness study.

Arthritis Res Ther. 2009 Apr 14;11(2):R54. [Epub ahead of print]Click here to read LinkOut

Treating patients with fibromyalgia in primary care settings under routine medical practice: a claim database cost and burden of illness study.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study is to analyze healthcare and non-healthcare resources utilization under routine medical practice in a primary care setting claims database, and to estimate the incremental average cost per patient per year of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) compared with a reference population. METHODS: A 12-month cross-sectional and retrospective study was completed using computerized medical records from a health provider database. Analyses were conducted from the perspective of the provider and the society viewpoint. Healthcare and non-healthcare resources utilization included drugs, complementary tests, all types of medical visits, referrals, hospitalizations, sick leaves and early retirement because of disability due to FMS. Patients with a diagnosis of FMS, in accordance with ICD-10 criteria, were included in the analysis if they had at least one claim for FMS during the 12 months prior to the end of May 2007. A non-FMS comparison group was also created with the remaining subjects. RESULTS: One thousand eighty-one subjects [96.7% women, 54.2 (10.1) years] met the criteria for FMS: 1.7%. After adjusting for age and sex, FMS subjects used significantly more healthcare resources than the reference population, had more sick leaves and the percentage of subjects with premature retirement was also significantly higher (P<0.001 in all cases). As a result, FMS subjects showed an incremental adjusted per-patient per-year total cost of 5,010 euros (95% CI: 3,494-6,076; +153%, P<0.001) on average compared with non-FMS subjects. Significantly higher differences were observed both in healthcare and non-healthcare adjusted costs; 614 euros (404-823; +66%) and 4,394 euros (3,373-5,420; +189%), respectively (P<0.001 in both cases). Annual drug expenditure per patient on average was considerably higher in FMS patients, 230 euros (124-335; +64%, P<0.001), than the reference group. CONCLUSIONS: Under routine medical practice, patients with FMS were associated with considerably higher annual total costs in the primary care setting compared with the reference population.

PMID: 19366441 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Muscle modifications in fibromyalgic patients revealed by surface electromyography (SEMG) analysis.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2009 Apr 15;10(1):36. [Epub ahead of print]

Muscle modifications in fibromyalgic patients revealed by surface electromyography (SEMG) analysis.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Several studies have been carried out in order to investigate surface electromyography (SEMG) response on fibromyalgic (FM) patients. Some studies failed to demonstrate differences between FM patients and healthy individuals while others found differences in SEMG parameters. Different muscular region have been analyzed in FM patients and heterogeneity is also produced because of the different ways in which the SEMG technique is used. The aims of this study were to evaluate muscle modifications by SEMG analysis in FM women with respect to a sample of healthy controls and to investigate the relationships between SEMG parameters and the clinical aspects of the disease. METHODS: SEMG was recorded in 100 FM women (48.10+/-11.96 yr) and in 50 healthy women (48.60+/-11.18 yr), from the tibialis anterior and the distal part of vastus medialis muscle during isometric contraction. Initial values and rate of change of median spectral frequency (MDF) and conduction velocity (CV) of the SEMG signal were calculated. The clinical parameters "Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire", pain, tender points, tiredness were evaluated and the relationships between these data and the SEMG results were also studied. For the statistical analysis Mann-Whitney test, chi-square test and Spearman correlation were used. RESULTS: MDF absolute values and the so-called Fatigue Index (FI) were significantly lower (p<0.001) in both muscles studied in FM patients (MDF: 93.2 microV; FI: 1.10, 0.89) with respect to healthy controls (MDF: 138.2 microV; FI: 2.41, 1.66) and a smaller reduction in the percentage values of MDF was observed in FM patients vs controls (22% vs 38%). A significant correlation was found between the SEMG parameter decrement of normalized median frequency (MNF) (%) and seriousness of FM (evaluated by means of tender points). CONCLUSIONS: We have found some interesting muscle modifications in FM patients with respect to healthy controls, regarding MDF, CV and FI values which resulted significantly lower in FM. Patients might have a different fiber recruitment or a possible atrophy of type II fibers suggesting that they are not able to reach muscle relaxation.

PMID: 19368705 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

KLYP956 is a Non-imidazole-Based Orally Active Inhibitor of Nitric Oxide Synthase Dimerization.

Mol Pharmacol. 2009 Apr 13. [Epub ahead of print]

KLYP956 is a Non-imidazole-Based Orally Active Inhibitor of Nitric Oxide Synthase Dimerization.

Kalypsys, Inc.

Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) generate nitric oxide (NO) through the oxidation of L-arginine. Inappropriate or excessive production of NO by NOS is associated with the pathophysiology of various disease states. Efforts to treat these disorders by developing arginine mimetic, substrate-competitive NOS inhibitors as drugs have met with little success. Small molecule mediated inhibition of NOS dimerization represents an intriguing alternative to substrate-competitive inhibition. An ultra high-throughput cell-based screen of 880,000 small molecules identified a novel quinolinone with inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitory activity. Exploratory chemistry based on this initial screening hit resulted in the synthesis of KLYP956, which inhibits iNOS at low nanomolar concentrations. The iNOS inhibitory potency of KLYP956 is insensitive to changes in concentrations of the substrate arginine, or the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin. Mechanistic analysis suggests that KLYP956 binds the oxygenase domain in the vicinity of the active site heme and inhibits iNOS and neuronal NOS (nNOS) by preventing the formation of enzymatically active dimers. Oral administration of KLYP956 inhibits iNOS activity in a murine model of endotoxemia and blocks pain behaviors in a formalin model of nociception. KLYP956 thus represents the first non-imidazole-based inhibitor of iNOS and nNOS dimerization and provides a novel pharmaceutical alternative to previously described substrate competitive inhibitors.

PMID: 19364813 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Risk markers for both chronic fatigue and irritable bowel syndromes: a prospective case-control study in primary care.

Psychol Med. 2009 Apr 15:1-9. [Epub ahead of print]

Risk markers for both chronic fatigue and irritable bowel syndromes: a prospective case-control study in primary care.

Academic Unit of Primary Health Care, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

BACKGROUND: Fatigue syndromes and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) often occur together. Explanations include being different manifestations of the same condition and simply sharing some symptoms.MethodA matched case-control study in UK primary care, using data collected prospectively in the General Practice Research Database (GPRD). The main outcome measures were: health-care utilization, specific symptoms and diagnoses. Risk markers were divided into distant (from 3 years to 1 year before diagnosis) and recent (1 year before diagnosis). RESULTS: A total of 4388 patients with any fatigue syndrome were matched to two groups of patients: those attending for IBS and those attending for another reason. Infections were specific risk markers for both syndromes, with viral infections being a risk marker for a fatigue syndrome [odds ratios (ORs) 2.3-6.3], with a higher risk closer to onset, and gastroenteritis a risk for IBS (OR 1.47, compared to a fatigue syndrome). Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) shared more distant risk markers with IBS than other fatigue syndromes, particularly other symptom-based disorders (OR 3.8) and depressive disorders (OR 2.3), but depressive disorders were a greater risk for CFS than IBS (OR 2.4). Viral infections were more of a recent risk marker for CFS compared to IBS (OR 2.8), with gastroenteritis a greater risk for IBS (OR 2.4). CONCLUSIONS: Both fatigue and irritable bowel syndromes share predisposing risk markers, but triggering risk markers differ. Fatigue syndromes are heterogeneous, with CFS sharing predisposing risks with IBS, suggesting a common predisposing pathophysiology.

PMID: 19366500 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Abnormalities in cognitive-emotional information processing in idiopathic environmental intolerance and somatoform disorders.

Comment:  The problem with most of these tests is that they fail to consider "reasons".  Anxiety tests, for example, ask "do you feel tired frequently"... yes or no.  Saying yes is a point for anxiety.  However, such a test fails to consider why someone may feel tired.  Do they work long hours?  Have a screaming baby who keeps them up at night?  Have CFS, hypothyroidism, hypoadrenalism, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, or another medical condition which causes fatigue?  What really needs to be asked is "do you feel tired frequently with no known cause"?  But they don't ask that because then they can't sell their CBT therapy.  This results in many being misdiagnosed with mental disorders or having their real symptoms blamed on their psyche.  Very sad!
 
J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;40(1):70-84. Epub 2008 May 23.Click here to read LinkOut

Abnormalities in cognitive-emotional information processing in idiopathic environmental intolerance and somatoform disorders.

Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Staudingerweg 9, D-55099 Mainz, Germany. witthoef@uni-mainz.de

Idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI) represents a functional somatic syndrome marked by diverse bodily complaints attributed to various substances in the environment. Evidence for abnormalities in affective information processing similar to somatoform disorders (SFD) has recently been found in people with IEI. In order to further investigate these cognitive-emotional abnormalities, we compared people with IEI (n=49), SFD only (n=43), and non-somatoform controls (n=54) with respect to their performance in the extrinsic affective Simon task (EAST). This task allowed us to dissociate indicators of automatic affective associations and emotional intrusion effects of both bodily complaints and IEI-trigger words. Negative association effects toward IEI-trigger words were strongest for IEI participants. Emotional intrusion effects of symptom words were larger both in IEI and SFD than in controls. The results of enhanced negative automatic evaluations of IEI-trigger words and greater attention allocation to symptom words support cognitive models of IEI.

PMID: 18501333 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Monday, April 13, 2009

75th Nevada Legislature designates September 2009 as National Indoor Toxic Mold Awareness Month

Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 7-Assemblymen Stewart;
Aizley, Anderson, Arberry, Atkinson, Bobzien, Buckley,
Carpenter, Christensen, Claborn, Cobb, Conklin, Denis,
Dondero Loop, Gansert, Goedhart, Goicoechea, Grady,
Gustavson, Hambrick, Hardy, Hogan, Horne, Kihuen,
Kirkpatrick, Koivisto, Leslie, Manendo, Mastroluca,
McArthur, McClain, Mortenson, Munford, Oceguera,
Ohrenschall, Parnell, Pierce, Segerblom, Settelmeyer,
Smith, Spiegel and Woodbury

Joint Sponsors: Senators Amodei, Breeden, Care, Carlton,
Cegavske, Coffin, Copening, Hardy, Horsford, Lee,
Mathews, McGinness, Nolan, Parks, Raggio, Rhoads,
Schneider, Townsend, Washington, Wiener and Woodhouse

FILE NUMBER..........

ASSEMBLY CONCURRENT RESOLUTION-Designating the
month of September 2009 as National Indoor Toxic Mold
Awareness Month.

WHEREAS, People of all ages and backgrounds throughout the
world have developed illnesses because of exposure to indoor toxic
mold, and it is estimated that 500,000 deaths occur annually in the
United States as a result of such exposure; and

WHEREAS, Most molds produce mycotoxins, which are toxic
vapors created by mold spores, that are poisonous to humans and
animals, and have even been used as biological weapons in war; and

WHEREAS, Aflatoxins are mycotoxins that are among the most
carcinogenic substances known, and the United States Food and
Drug Administration has enforced regulatory limits on aflatoxin
concentrations in foods and feeds since 1965; and

WHEREAS, Mycotoxins enter the body through inhalation,
ingestion or contact with the skin and can result in a multitude of
symptoms, including, but not limited to, dermatitis, cough, rhinitis,
nosebleeds, cold- and flu-like symptoms, headache, general malaise
and fever; and

WHEREAS, Mycotoxin exposure can lead to toxic injury that
may include multiple potentially life-threatening illnesses, affecting
the skin and the nervous, vascular, respiratory, digestive,
reproductive, urinary and immune systems, as well as forming
cancers within the body; and

WHEREAS, Certain species of molds, referred to as "body
temperature molds," can live and grow inside the human body,
causing recurring infections and numerous other health problems as
well as death; and

WHEREAS, Mycotoxin Toxic Exposure Injury is a chronic,
debilitating condition causing serious economic, employment,
housing, health, social and other consequences, including death; and

WHEREAS, While there is no practical way to eliminate all
molds and mold spores in the indoor environment, indoor mold
growth can be curtailed by controlling moisture and ensuring that
any damp or wet building materials and furnishings are cleaned and
dried within 24 to 48 hours to prevent mold growth; and

WHEREAS, National Indoor Toxic Mold Awareness Month is an
opportunity to bring greater attention to the need for further
education and consumer awareness about molds and mycotoxins;
now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED BY THE ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF NEVADA, THE
SENATE CONCURRING, That the 75th Nevada Legislature designates
September 2009 as National Indoor Toxic Mold Awareness Month;
and be it further

RESOLVED, That the Legislature recognizes that by increasing
awareness about indoor toxic mold, we can prevent needless
hazardous conditions that take the lives of thousands every year and
adversely affect the health and well-being of many more.
20 ~~~~~ 09

Keller Rohrback L.L.P. Investigates Toxic Ingredients in Baby Shampoo and Bath Products

Keller Rohrback L.L.P. Investigates Toxic Ingredients in Baby Shampoo and Bath Products
http://www.globenewswire.com/ca/news_releases.html?d=162922

SEATTLE, April 13, 2009 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Attorney Advertising. Keller Rohrback L.L.P. (www.krclassaction.com) announces its investigation of certain popular baby shampoos and other products that may contain toxic ingredients, according to a recent study by the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, a national coalition of nonprofit health and environmental organizations. Although the companies manufacturing and marketing these products call them "gentle" and "pure," dozens of top-selling children's bath products are contaminated with the cancer-causing chemicals formaldehyde and 1,4-dioxane, according to the March 2009 Campaign for Safe Cosmetics report, "No More Toxic Tub."

This study is the first to document the widespread presence of both formaldehyde and 1,4-dioxane in bath products for children, including baby shampoos, bubble baths and baby lotions. Many products tested contained both chemicals. Among the most contaminated products are:
 * Johnson's Baby Shampoo;
 * Sesame Street Bubble Bath;
 * Grins & Giggles Milk & Honey Baby Wash (Gerber);
 * Huggies Baby Wash;
 * L'Oreal Kids;
 * Mustela;
 * Suave Kids;
 * Baby Magic Baby Lotion; and
 * American Girl shower products.

For a list of products and the test results, visit: http://safecosmetics.org/article.php?id=426. If you or someone you know purchased these or similar products, we would be happy to speak with you.

According to attorney Lynn Lincoln Sarko, a longtime advocate for consumers: "There is absolutely no need for children's products to contain cancer-causing ingredients when perfectly safe alternatives exist. It is outrageous to think that instead of bathing their children in soap, parents are actually bathing them in formaldehyde."

For more information about the scientific study leading to this investigation, visit: http://safecosmetics.org/article.php?id=414.

If you would like to contact an attorney about this investigation, please call Gretchen Freeman Cappio, Laura Gerber, or paralegal Mary Garner by telephone, toll-free at 1-800-776-6044, or via e-mail at: info@kellerrohrback.com.
Keller Rohrback, with offices in Seattle and Phoenix, has successfully pursued claims against product manufacturers, pharmaceutical companies, and medical device makers on behalf of our injured clients. We have achieved multi-million dollar settlements providing for damages and, in certain cases, medical monitoring.

Attorney Advertising. Prior Results Do Not Guarantee A Similar Outcome.
CONTACT:  Keller Rohrback L.L.P.
          Gretchen Freeman Cappio, Attorney
          Laura R. Gerber, Attorney
          Mary Garner, Paralegal
          800-776-6044
          info@kellerrohrback.com
          www.krclassaction.com

ACTIVISM: Atlanta airport grooving to clean music (and using scents to "enhance" mood)

Please take a minute to send a short email the Atlanta airport and let them know that their addition of fragrances and in the airport is a disability access issue and makes the airport dangerous for millions of Americans with asthma, emphysema, and allergies.  Speaking about how it will affect their bottom line is important. 
 
A few points to consider addressing include:
1.  The use of fragrance blocks access to those with asthma, emphysema, allergies, and sensitivities. 
2.  Fragrances adhere to clothing, skin, and hair like cigarette smoke and remaining with the traveler their entire trip.
3.  The use of fragrances increases the chances of breathing emergencies in flight.
4.  The use of fragrances increases the chances of lawsuits against the airport.
5.  Fragrances contain 3,000 - 5,000 chemicals, mostly petrochemicals, 80% have not been tested for human safety.
6.  Fragrances are known respiratory irritants
7.  This is an ADA compliance concern for passengers as well as airport personnel.
8.  Fragrance companies use deceit and trickery to promote that fragrances enhance travelers experiences because they have a vested financial interest in selling their products, a marketing scam to take businesses for what they can sell you at the expense of public health and bottom-line profits.
 
In summary, fragrances will not enhance travelers experiences, they will create lawsuits, medical emergencies, and prevent access to millions... causing financial losses to the airport.  Please discontinue the practice of adding fragrances to the air.
 
 
This was the original article:
 

ACTIVISM: Public Comments Needed on FDA Docket for Mercury Safety in Fish Consumption by Pregnant Women

Public comments are being accepted on the FDA docket below regarding the safety of mercury in fish for pregnant woman.  Industry is, of course, downplaying the risk.  So, your comments are important. 
 
Docket  FDA-2009-N-0018
Docket Title 
Report of Quantitative Risk & Benefit Assessment of Commercial Fish Consumption, Focusing on Fetal Neurodevelopmental Effects & on Coronary Heart Disease & Stroke in the General Population
Docket Type  Nonrulemaking
Document ID  FDA-2009-N-0018-0001
Views  View file in html format  View file in pdf format 
Add Comments  Add Comments 
How To Comment  Submit written comments to the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. Submit electronic comments to http:// www.regulations.gov.

P.A.N.D.O.R.A. (Florida) Announces “Walk In My Shoes” Walkathon

P.A.N.D.O.R.A. Announces "Walk In My Shoes" Walkathon

 
 
Walk with P.A.N.D.O.R.A to benefit children, men and women stricken with Neuroendocrineimmune Disorders such as:
 
 
chronic fatigue syndrome/ME (CFS/ME),
fibromyalgia (FM),
Gulf War illnesses (GWI),
multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS) or
environmental illnesses (EI) and
chronic Lyme disease (CLD).
 
 
Your participation supports research that can lead to scientific breakthroughs, physician training, scholarships for the chronically ill, quality of life outreach programs and advocacy initiatives.
 
 
The "Walk In My Shoes" walkathon will be held:
Saturday, May 23, 2009, 7:30 AM
CB Smith Park
900 N. Flamingo Rd.
Pembroke Pines, FL 33028
 
 
Check -in:  7:30 to 8:30 am
Walk begins:  9:00 am sharp
 
 
To register for the walkathon, click HERE.  To donate to the walkathon, click HERE.

Sunday, April 12, 2009

Martin L. Pall Launhes Website for the NO/ONOO- theory for CFS, MCS, FM, and PTSD

Martin L. Pall, Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry and Basic Medical Sciences, Washington State University and Research Director, The Tenth Paradigm Research Group launched http://thetenthparadigm.org/index.html which explains the NO/ONOO- theory and various treatment protocols for CFS, MCS, FM, and PTSD.  The MCS page is still under construction, however the rest of the site is up and running.

Volatile organic compounds and formaldehyde as explaining factors for sensory irritation in office environments.

 J Occup Environ Hyg. 2009 Apr;6(4):239-47.Click here to read Links

Volatile organic compounds and formaldehyde as explaining factors for sensory irritation in office environments.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19184725?ordinalpos=12&itool=Email.EmailReport.Pubmed_ReportSelector.Pubmed_RVDocSum

Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. heidi.salonen@ttl.fi

This study's database comprised results of volatile organic compound (VOC) measurements from 176 office buildings. In 23 of the 176 buildings, formaldehyde measurements were also conducted. It was suspected that the buildings had indoor air problems, but a walk-through inspection did not reveal any clear, abnormal contaminant sources. The 50 most abundant VOCs and their concentrations in 520 air samples were analyzed. The irritation potency was estimated for 33 out of the 50 common VOCs and their mixtures, as well as for formaldehyde. This information was used to calculate the recommended indoor air levels (RILs) for the VOCs. The RILs were considerably higher than the measured mean indoor air concentrations in the buildings. However, the RIL for formaldehyde was exceeded in most of the 23 buildings studied. According to the evaluation of irritation potency, formaldehyde was a more likely cause of sensory irritation than the mixture of common nonreactive VOCs at the concentrations that occurred in the buildings without abnormal indoor sources. Furthermore, environmental symptoms of office workers were characterized in 20 office buildings (including the database of 176 office buildings) with the aid of an indoor air questionnaire. The most frequent symptoms related to the indoor environment were involved the upper respiratory tract. However, no relationship could be shown between the reported symptoms and the occurrence of VOC and formaldehyde concentrations in these buildings. Generally, the study results indicated that formaldehyde was the more likely agent causing sensory irritation than the mixture of the common nonreactive VOCs at the concentrations occurring in the buildings without abnormal indoor sources.

PMID: 19184725 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Induction of metallothionein in mouse cerebellum and cerebrum with low-dose thimerosal injection.

Cell Biol Toxicol. 2009 Apr 9. [Epub ahead of print]Click here to read Links

Induction of metallothionein in mouse cerebellum and cerebrum with low-dose thimerosal injection.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19357975?ordinalpos=1&itool=Email.EmailReport.Pubmed_ReportSelector.Pubmed_RVDocSum

Department of Life Sciences, School of Science & Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-osaka, Osaka, 577-8502, Japan, minamita@life.kindai.ac.jp.

Thimerosal, an ethyl mercury compound, is used worldwide as a vaccine preservative. We previously observed that the mercury concentration in mouse brains did not increase with the clinical dose of thimerosal injection, but the concentration increased in the brain after the injection of thimerosal with lipopolysaccharide, even if a low dose of thimerosal was administered. Thimerosal may penetrate the brain, but is undetectable when a clinical dose of thimerosal is injected; therefore, the induction of metallothionein (MT) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein was observed in the cerebellum and cerebrum of mice after thimerosal injection, as MT is an inducible protein. MT-1 mRNA was expressed at 6 and 9 h in both the cerebrum and cerebellum, but MT-1 mRNA expression in the cerebellum was three times higher than that in the cerebrum after the injection of 12 microg/kg thimerosal. MT-2 mRNA was not expressed until 24 h in both organs. MT-3 mRNA was expressed in the cerebellum from 6 to 15 h after the injection, but not in the cerebrum until 24 h. MT-1 and MT-3 mRNAs were expressed in the cerebellum in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, MT-1 protein was detected from 6 to 72 h in the cerebellum after 12 microg/kg of thimerosal was injected and peaked at 10 h. MT-2 was detected in the cerebellum only at 10 h. In the cerebrum, little MT-1 protein was detected at 10 and 24 h, and there were no peaks of MT-2 protein in the cerebrum. In conclusion, MT-1 and MT-3 mRNAs but not MT-2 mRNA are easily expressed in the cerebellum rather than in the cerebrum by the injection of low-dose thimerosal. It is thought that the cerebellum is a sensitive organ against thimerosal. As a result of the present findings, in combination with the brain pathology observed in patients diagnosed with autism, the present study helps to support the possible biological plausibility for how low-dose exposure to mercury from thimerosal-containing vaccines may be associated with autism.

PMID: 19357975 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Blog Archive